Any written work submitted by a student is assessed on its originality as well as the depth and breadth of research undertaken. It follows that plagiarism, collusion, and the falsification of data are all prohibited.

Plagiarism is using the work of other people to gain some form of benefit, without formally acknowledging that the work came from someone else. To avoid plagiarism, students should reference correctly, which involves paraphrasing, using appropriate in-text citations, and including an adequate and complete reference list following standard (Harvard or Vancouver reference style). Paraphrasing is using own words to express someone else’s ideas while still preserving the main ideas of the original source. Even when paraphrasing, the writer must still give credit to the original author.

Collusion consists of entrusting to a third party the task of writing all or part of a piece of written work or a thesis but then passing off all of the final product as one’s own work.

Falsifying data consists of deliberately creating and using, in the context of a piece of written work or a thesis, data which one knows to be false, or of altering genuine data to make it support desired conclusions

If there is indicated plagiarism, collusion, or falsification of data in the assignment, then the work or even the course will obtain a mark of zero. Moreover, if there is indicated plagiarism, collusion, or falsification of data in the thesis, the thesis will be canceled, and the degree will be revoked.